Furniture Clinic Danish Oil for Wood - Premium Oil to Enhance The Natural Beauty of Oak, Pine & More - Seal & Protect for a Satin Finish. 500ml

£9.9
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Furniture Clinic Danish Oil for Wood - Premium Oil to Enhance The Natural Beauty of Oak, Pine & More - Seal & Protect for a Satin Finish. 500ml

Furniture Clinic Danish Oil for Wood - Premium Oil to Enhance The Natural Beauty of Oak, Pine & More - Seal & Protect for a Satin Finish. 500ml

RRP: £99
Price: £9.9
£9.9 FREE Shipping

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Description

Once the last coat of Danish Oil has dried and you have smoothed over the surface with a De-nibbing Pad.

I went back through some old posts and found one where I'd previously butchered a BLO oak piece by using Briwax, think I put it on too soon and didn't allow the BLO to cure. It is our preferred application method due to the way the texture interacts with the surface during the oiling and rubbing process. Allow to penetrate for 10-20 minutes before wiping off any excess with a lint-free cloth in the direction of the grain. Which method you choose depends upon the time available to you, and how quickly the oiled wood needs to be used.

I have read somewhere that the blackness on oiled wood left outside is due to a fungus which grows in it. We highly recommend giving your furniture a light sand before applying Danish oil (or any other finish for that matter) to remove any imperfections and raised grain.

Here is the newly updated 2013 edition of this guide, with the Rubio Monocoat and the Blanchon Original Wood Environment tested and under scrutiny. Applying Danish oil to oak can create a beautiful, low-gloss finish that will last a long time and resist water and other liquids. Whilst you are oiling, you do not want the hard-wax (resin) sitting freely on the surface, living a life of its own. They say that the reaction between the oil and the door would be pretty much immediate and obvious, so at least the one coat we have put on so far hasn't reacted. Despite the impression that it sinks in, oil sits on top of the wood (except at the end grains) and doesn't sink in particularly.

I would remove the oil you've already applied with white spirit (may take several goes), check with Howdens what they recommend these days and use that instead. And, if you do have a small scratch, you can easily apply another coat of Danish oil to make it disappear. Apply with a brush or lint-free cotton cloth and allow to penetrate for 5 to 10 minutes before wiping off the excess with a clean lint-free cloth. You would have been better off using Rustins "Garden furniture oil" This has an added UV filter and bioside and is much better for outside use, danish can be used outside but is better inside. This method allows any nibs or dust to be removed with very fine grade wire wool or fine abrasive paper between coats of Danish Oil if necessary.

For a sideboard that'll just sit there and look pretty just a couple of days would usually be sufficient. So, make sure you do not overlook any steps; quality woodworking is all about getting the small details right. We were advised by the joiner who fitted them, that Danish Oil would be the best to treat the doors with, so thats what we did. But it looks as though shellac is really best as a sealer AFTER putting on, say, BSO, dutch oil, etc. A. Yes, once dry, the Danish Oil is completely safe and compliant with Materials and Articles in Contact with Food Regulations.

Best of all, when the finish starts to wear away after a few years or lots of use, you can reapply a coat of Danish oil, and it will look as good as new again. Varnished, shellaced, lacquered or heavily stained wood will usually present a surface barrier to absorption of the Danish Oil, and will need to be removed as necessary with a proprietary paint stripper.



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